Descendants of Basil O'NEALE

Prepared by
The O'Neal Genealogy Association




First Generation *
Second Generation *
Third Generation *
Fourth Generation *
 
 

First Generation

1. Basil O'neale 1, son of Peter Lamar O'neale II and Unknown Spouse, was born on October 19, 1758 in Prince George's County, Maryland,1 died on October 31, 1849 in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia, at age 91,2 and was buried in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia.3

Note: Information on Basil and descendants sent by Carol (Gehrs) Mitchell, 10/14/2002.
Publication: 1987, Columbia Co., Georgia, USA. (14) Small groups of colonists gathered in the courthouses, meeting houses and. taverns of Virginia and read bulletins advertising fertile land in the new  colony of Georgia. Copies of this bulletin were tacked to trees along wilderness trails in North Carolina and South Carolina.
The land which sold for $5 for the first 100 acres, was far, away, across rugged paths through uninhabited territories. Colonists reading the bulletins in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina joined together, formed wagon trains and prepared for the journey across the Appalachian valleys.
One of these colonists was Basil O'Neal, born of English immigrant parents in Maryland in 1758, where, he lived until he was 17 years old. He moved to Virginia where he met and married Ellen Briscoe, great-grand daughter of Lord Bromfield of England. Together, the young couple prepared for the adventurous trek to Georgia.
Hardship and adventure were not new to O'Neal These were the years of the American Revolution and on Sept. 20, 1777 in Henry County, Va., Basil O'Neal had signed the oath of allegiance to fight for the 13 colonies.
It was in Virginia that Basil, armed with a musket 6 feet long, served most of his time as a soldier of the Revolution. Basil named his musket 'Buckaneer" for the many deer it had felled. This was the weapon with which he had killed bear for food, fought the Indians and struggled for the colonies freedom from England. Now, it would protect Basil and his wife from the perils of the wilderness on the treacherous journey to their new home in Georgia.
Basil and Ellen rode pack horses side Conestoga wagons which carried the elderly, the children and the wealthy as far as the trails would permit. Ox carts loaded with bed. steads, feather beds, quilts, pots and tools, completed the roughest parts of the trip.Each family brought approximately 50 head of cattle, horses, hogs and sheep to start their new farms. Flocks of honking geese, whose feathers were used to make bedding, completed the caravan.
Before leaving civilized Virginia for the backwoods colony of Georgia Ellen carefully wrapped the roots of seedling peach and apple trees with which the couple planned to start orchards on their new home site:
The trip was long and arduous, tut the pioneers were hardy. They dined on salted deer and bear meat. wild turkey, squirrel and fish as they crossed miles of rugged country . Some of the, wealthier settlers brought chests - filled with china and silver. mahogany sideboards and most valuable of all, slaves to help wrest homes from the frontier. They were members of Virginia society who wished to recreate the life style of English country gentlemen.
Basil O'Neal and his family were also products or this upbringing, although they came to Georgia without slaves or great wealth. In 1780, Basil and Ellen arrived at their new home site of virgin forest lush with springs and streams. which is now located in Winfield Community in Columbia County. Columbia County, at that time was inhabited by several groups of settlers who had founded churches, and these early settlers greeted the newcomers with hospitality and gladness for there was safety in numbers.
These were dangerous times. The settlers still were wary of the indigenous Indians and the ongoing Revolutionary War. Documents from the commissioner of pensions indicate that Basil fought for a short while with Revolutionary troops after his arrival in Georgia.
But Basil was optimistic about the future. He named his property Happy Valley and while the war still raged, he cut timber from his land and built a log cabin of two main rooms in the front and two small rooms in the rear. The main body of the house stood a story and a half high and was made of hewn logs, 15 x 8 inches, dovetailed at each corner. Basil lovingly planted the seedling fruit trees which they had brought from Virginia, and soon rows of trees blossomed in the hot Georgia sun. Excess fruit was made into brandy and early visitors to Happy Valley remember that brandy and honey were always found on the sideboard.
While Basil labored to clear the land and plant his crops, a peace treaty was signed with England which freed the settlers from the constant worry of warfare.
As the nation grew and prospered, so did the O'Neal Family. The house was expanded to an area twice Its original size with a plaza running the front of the house, 62 feet long. Here, Basil and Ellen O'Neal raised six children, acquired approximately 50 Negro slaves and became respected members of Columbia County society.
Basil was renowned throughout the county for his marksmanship. His son, in his autobiography, remembers an incident in which Basil sent his overseer, a Negro man named Smalley, out to kill squirrels for breakfast.
"My father heard him shoot six times but only reported five squirrels for breakfast. Where is the other squirrel, asked my father. Smalley reported that he missed aim one time. Put that gun up, said my father in disgust, until you can learn how to shoot.
It was during this time, in the fervor of patriotism which swept the nation after the Revolution, that the O'Neals dropped the "O" from their name and thereafter, the family was known as Neal.
In 1828, when Basil was 70 years old, Ellen died and was buried in a family cemetery In a grove of cedars near the log house she had helped to build. The next year, Basil, reportedly still young in body and spirit,
married Sarah Hull Green, the 30 year old daughter of Capt. McKeen Green, a Revolutionary soldier and relative of Gen. Nathaniel Green. This marriage produced six children, the last of which was born when Basil was 85 years old.
Research Notes: Basil signed a will on 15 Mar 1849-14 Dec 1848 in Columbia Co., Georgia, USA.Basil Oneal's Will Registered 15th March 1849 Georgia, Columbia County
In the name of God Amen! I Basil Oneal of the County and State aforesaid, being advanced in years, and knowing that all men must die, having been blessed with a family and some property, do make and Ordain this my last Will and Testament.
Item 1st. I request that my Executors pay all my just debts.
Item 2nd. I give unto my wife Sarah H. Neal four of the 1st choice of my horses, riding carriages, such of my stock of all kinds as she may think necessary for carrying on the farm and so much of the other perishable property of all kinds and sorts, classes etc. as may be dexxed necessary and proper for keeping house and carrying on the farm, the balance to be sold by my executors, and applied as hereafter named (as slaves or surpluses) also I loan my wife Sarah during her lifetime or until she may intermarry my negro boy Nelson, my negro woman Chaney and her child Charlotte at her death to be equally divided among my children by her.
Item 3d. I give unto my five children by my present wife (viz.) Sarah Jane, Amanda Ann, Basil Llewellen, Mariah Frances, and James Augustus, the following negroes (viz., Nero, old Ben, Renney, Lucy, Rosetter, Caty, Abe, Dicy, Harry, Alcy, Milley, Jeffrey, Dennis, Charles, Caroline, old Aron & Marshall with their future increase, also all my landed property, lying and being in the County of Columbia the same being five hundred acres more or less. All the money or notes I may possess at my death or may after from crops sales surpluses etc. over and above raising and educating them the property given them and what I may hereafter give them to be equally divided among them all when the youngest becomes of age.
I authorise my Executors to loan such property as they think can be spared to those that may marry before the youngest becomes of age. I also give my two sons hereafter named Basil Llewellen & James Augustus my tract of land lying in Dooly County containing two hundred two and a half acres and my fire arms.--The property give to my wife Sarah and my children by her to be kept together on the farms where on I now live, by my Executors for their xxxx support and raising and education.
Item 4th. I give unto my daughter Eleanor Smalley the Negroes now in her possession as a loan (viz.) Fanny, Frankey, Permelia, Smith, Jonas, Bassil, and the infant children of Fanny and Frankey with their future increase to during her life as a gift or loan, at her death to be equally divided among her children (or their issue).
Item 5th. I give unto my decreased daughter Elizabeth Dunn's children the Negroes in the possession of Wm. S. Dunn my son in law as a loan (viz) Kitty, Rachel, Rhoda, Ann, Aggy, Thomas and the young children of Kitty with their future increase forever.
Item 6th. I give unto my grandson Jas. B. Neal, the negroes now in his possession viz. Mahala, John, Isabel, Lezar, & Savannah with their future increase to him and his heirs forever.
Item 7th. I give unto my grandson Richard S. Neal the negroes in his possession viz. Joseph, Anderson, Patsy, Hapsey & young Aggy with their future increase, also our bed and furniture & cow and calf to him & his heirs forever. I also give unto my Grandsons James B. & Richard S. Neal my tract of land lying in Paulding County containing fifty acres.
Item 8th. The following negroes I decide shall be divided unto two equal lots or shares (viz.) Oliver, old Aggy, Jerry, young Ben, Elijah, Hiram, William, Easter, Josey, Elleck, Randle, Adam, Old Mary, Solomon,
Hariett, young Mary, Terry, Allen, Charity, and Savannah with their future increase. One of the lots or shares I give unto my five children by my present wife heretofore named the other lot or share to be divided unto four equal lots, one lot I give unto my two grandsons James B. Neal and Richard S. Neal, One lot to my daughter Eleanor Smalley, one lot to my decreased daughter Elizabeth Dunn's children, this fourth and last lot my decreased daughter Ann McCord's children.
9th. I give my son in law James McCord, John Livingston, William S. Dunn, Daughter in law Dorothy Palmer one dollar such as their certain portion of my estate.
10th. Should my wife marry and remain with my children on the farm I wish her supported so long as she may remain with them.
11th. I request that no division of any kind take place until after the gathering of the crops.
Finally I constitute and appoint my wife Sarah H. Neal Exer and James B. & Richard S. Neal Exers. to see this my last Will and Testament carried fully unto effect.
In witnesses where of I Basil O'Neal have this day set my hand and seal A.D. One thousand eight hundred and forty six,
third day of June Signed Sealed & Acknowledged in the presence of us the year and day above written. A. G. Dozier, Basil ONeal (LS), Daniel L. Marshall, Joseph G. Marshall Georgia Columbia County Albert G. Dozier, Daniel L. Marshall, and Joseph G. Marshall the three subscribing witnesses to the within and foregoing instrument after being duly sworn upon the Holy Evanglxx depose and say that they were personally present and saw the testator Basil ONeal in life sign seal pronounce and declare the same to be his last Will and Testament that the testator was of sound and disposing mind and memory at the doing thereof and that they signed the same at the request and in the presence of the testator and in the presence of each other.Sworn to in open court A. G. Dozier the 14th day of December 1848. Daniel L. Marshall, G. Jones, Clerk, Joseph G. Marshall
Note: Basil Oneal's will listed his children as Neal so when they all signed and acknowledged the will as neal (as a deed poll ) they legally changed their name as a group to Neal from ONeal. (O'Neale)
Sent by Carol (Gehrs) Mitchell, 10/14/2002
Basil married Sarah Hull Green on July 22, 1829 in Columbia County, Georgia.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 2 M i. Basil "Llewellen" NEAL was born on April 5, 1837, died on April 13, 1927 in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia, at age 90, and was buried in Neal Cemetery, Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia.
+ 3 F ii. Sarah Jane NEAL was born after 1829.
+ 4 F iii. Amanda Ann NEAL was born in 1834, died on December 14, 1858, at age 24, and was buried in Neal Cemetery, Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia.
Basil next married Mary Ellen "Milly" BRISCOE,4 daughter of Dr. John Briscoe and Ann WOOD, on January 17, 1783 in Henry County, Virginia.4

Children from this marriage were:

+ 5 M i. John Briscoe NEAL was born in 1790, died in 1820 in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia, at age 30, and was buried in Happy Valley Cemetery, Columbia County, Georgia. John married Dorothy BARLOW.
+ 6 M ii. Augustus NEALE .
+ 7 F iii. Eleanor NEAL . Eleanor married Michael SMALLEY.
+ 8 F iv. Elizabeth NEAL . Elizabeth married William S. DUNN.
+ 9 F v. Nancy "Ann" NEAL was born in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia and died in 1827-1834 in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia.
Nancy married James McCORD on February 12, 1807 in Columbia County, Georgia.
+ 10 F vi. Palatia "Mary" "Polly" NEAL .
Second Generation

2. Basil "Llewellen" NEAL (Basil 1) was born on April 5, 1837, died on April 13, 1927 in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia, at age 90, and was buried in Neal Cemetery, Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia.

Research Notes: Publication: 1987, Columbia Co., Georgia
It was Basil's son, Basil Llewellin Neal, born of the second marriage in 1837, who followed most closely in his father's footsteps. He, like his father, became a military man and master of Happy Valley, and he left a fascinating autobiography which paints a graphic picture of life in antebellum Columbia County, then as a Confederate soldier, and finally as a farmer in the postwar South.
Llewellin grew up surrounded by slaves, he rode a horse to school and watched wagon loads of tobacco, sometimes as many as 100 at a time, rolling down the road beside Happy Valley on their way to markets in Augusta.
When Llewellin was 12, his father died. Basil was buried in the family burial plot under a stone hand carved by Llewellin. Another, larger stone, reading "Basil Neal, Rev. War" and placed by the Daughters of the American Revolution, pays tribute to Basil's role in the colonial struggle for freedom.
After Basil's death, the children were guided by the firm hand or their mother, who raised them to be devout Melhodist. This religious training stayed with Llewellin all his life. Llewellin often called upon his faith in the trying years ahead as the nation, which Basil had fought to create, divided and fought bitterly against itself. In Apr 1861, Confederate troops attacked Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor and the Civil War began. ..
Llewellin, armed with his father's rifle '"Buckaneer" and a 2 foot-long, two-edged sword of fine steel, answered the call for Georgia troops. When asked once in an interview after the war, "How many Yankees did you kill with your sword?" Llewellin replied, "Oh, I don't know, but I killed as many of them as they did of me, I am sure."
From this state unit, the Sixth Georgia Regiment, Llewellin was mustered into the Army for the Confederacy, where he served as a color bearer until his capture in 1864. In the fall or 1864 Llewellin was captured and served six cold, hungry months as a prisoner of war in Port Lookout, Md. His diary records his longing for Happy Valley during his imprisonment. "I dream of  mother, and Oh, the Lord only knows, how much I want to see her and be with her once more. Who will care for her now? Her footsteps are feeble, her hair is turning gray and she needs protection such as I hope to afford her one day, if the Lord preserves me."
On March 17, 1865, LlewelIin was released from prison in an exchange for an equal number or federal prisoners. He saw the surrender at Appomattox and wrote of Lee, astride a white horse addressing his troops.
"'Go home, 'Lee said,' be as good citizens as you have been soldiers."
"1 made my way from Virginia to Georgia by various modes of travel,"
LlewelIin wrote of his trip home, ."The railroads were torn up in many places and where I found no other I means of transportation I walked - and this was much of the way."
The South to which LlewelIin returned was very different from the antebellum South he had left. Augusta was under martial law and federal troops controlled the city. The slaves which had made Happy Valley prosper were now free men, But, Llewellin was strong and healthy and ready to begin a new life.
Llewellin always had been a ladies man, and he soon met and wooed Martha Pierce Palmer of Augusta. Llewellin declared his love for Miss Palmer in a carriage on the way home from her uncle's home in Richmond County.
We found that we had taken the wrong road, a thing not hard to do at anytime in the piney woods of Richmond County," he wrote. And it was here, in a pine forest that Llewellin asked Miss Palmer to be his wife and she accepted. They were married In 1865.
The joy of Llewellin's homecoming and honeymoon was marred by an incident involving the death of a former slave whom Llewellin felt had insulted his mother. Llewellin went to the nearby plantation where the Negro man lived. "I knew there was considerable risk in going unaccompanied by any white person to a large plantation where there  were only Negroes, and on the way; I dismounted, and falling on my knees, asked the Lord to protect me from al1.harm," he wrote in his autobiography. Both of the men were armed and in the fracas which ensued, Llewellin shot and killed the Negro man. A contingent or federal troops was sent out from Augusta to arrest L1ewellin. By then, however, he had fled to Alabama, where he remained in hiding for eight months until Llewellin's family assured him that it was safe to return home. Llewellin and his wife left Happy Valley for several years, but returned and lived there until their deaths. At the time of Llewellin's death in 1918, at the age of 90, he was recognized as the only surviving son of a Revolutionary soldier.
The house at Happy Valley burned on Dec. 31, 1973, and its charred remains and piles of stone now sit within the decaying remnants of a white picket fence.
3. Sarah Jane NEAL (Basil 1) was born after 1829.

4. Amanda Ann NEAL (Basil 1) was born in 1834, died on December 14, 1858, at age 24, and was buried in Neal Cemetery, Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia.

5. John Briscoe NEAL (Basil 1) was born in 1790, died in 1820 in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia, at age 30, and was buried in Happy Valley Cemetery, Columbia County, Georgia.

John married Dorothy BARLOW.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 11 M i. James Briscoe NEAL . James married Martha M. WRIGHT on March 21, 1843 in Lincoln County, Georgia.
+ 12 M ii. Richard Southard NEAL . Richard married Lucy Ann DUNN.
+ 13 M iii. Basil NEAL was born in 1817, died in 1821, at age 4, and was buried in Happy Valley Cemetery, Columbia County, Georgia.
6. Augustus NEALE (Basil 1).

7. Eleanor NEAL (Basil 1). Eleanor married Michael SMALLEY.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 14 F i. Ellen SMALLEY was born about 1821. Ellen married Robert WARE on April 27, 1848 in Lincoln County, Georgia.
+ 15 M ii. Hugh SMALLEY was born in 1823.
+ 16 M iii. Ferdinand SMALLEY was born on September 7, 1824 in Lincoln County, Georgia and died on July 24, 1902 in Pierce's Chapel, Wilkes County, Georgia, at age 77.
+ 17 M iv. James SMALLEY was born in 1825.
+ 18 F v. Salina SMALLEY was born in 1827. Salina married William A. GUNBY on November 21, 1850 in Lincoln County, Georgia.
+ 19 F vi. Eliza "Liza" SMALLEY was born about 1829.
+ 20 F vii. Polly SMALLEY was born about 1831.
+ 21 M viii. Chapley "Chap" SMALLEY was born in 1833.
+ 22 M ix. Michael Benjamin SMALLEY was born on December 24, 1837.
8. Elizabeth NEAL (Basil 1). Elizabeth married William S. DUNN.

9. Nancy "Ann" NEAL (Basil 1) was born in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia and died in 1827-1834 in Happy Valley, Columbia County, Georgia.

Nancy married James McCORD, son of John McCORD and Alice HYATT, on February 12, 1807 in Columbia County, Georgia.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 23 F i. Mary McCORD was born in 1808 in Richmond County, Georgia. Mary married William SPIERS on January 1, 1830.
+ 24 M ii. John N. McCORD was born in 1809 in Richmond County, Georgia. John married Martha WARE on December 21, 1837.
+ 25 M iii. Basil McCORD was born on December 8, 1810 in Lincoln County, Georgia and died on September 7, 1894 in Pontotoc County, Mississippi, at age 83. Basil married Mary Ann WARE on December 15, 1835.
10. Palatia "Mary" "Polly" NEAL (Basil 1).
 
 

Third Generation

11. James Briscoe NEAL (John Briscoe 5, Basil 1). James married Martha M. WRIGHT on March 21, 1843 in Lincoln County, Georgia.

12. Richard Southard NEAL (John Briscoe 5, Basil 1). Richard married Lucy Ann DUNN, daughter of Doctor W. A. DUNN and Unknown.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 26 M i. Robert Eugene NEAL . Robert married Emma Amelia FORTSON. Robert next married Sallie FORTSON. 13. Basil NEAL (John Briscoe 5, Basil 1) was born in 1817, died in 1821, at age 4, and was buried in Happy Valley Cemetery, Columbia County, Georgia.

14. Ellen SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born about 1821. Ellen married Robert WARE on April 27, 1848 in Lincoln County, Georgia.

15. Hugh SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born in 1823.

16. Ferdinand SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born on September 7, 1824 in Lincoln County, Georgia and died on July 24, 1902 in Pierce's Chapel, Wilkes County, Georgia, at age 77.

17. James SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born in 1825.

18. Salina SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born in 1827. Salina married William A. GUNBY on November 21, 1850 in Lincoln County, Georgia.

19. Eliza "Liza" SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born about 1829.

20. Polly SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born about 1831.

21. Chapley "Chap" SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born in 1833.

22. Michael Benjamin SMALLEY (Eleanor NEAL 7, Basil 1) was born on December 24, 1837.

23. Mary McCORD (Nancy "Ann" NEAL 9, Basil 1) was born in 1808 in Richmond County, Georgia. Mary married William SPIERS on January 1, 1830.

24. John N. McCORD (Nancy "Ann" NEAL 9, Basil 1) was born in 1809 in Richmond County, Georgia. John married Martha WARE on December 21, 1837.

25. Basil McCORD (Nancy "Ann" NEAL 9, Basil 1) was born on December 8, 1810 in Lincoln County, Georgia and died on September 7, 1894 in Pontotoc County, Mississippi, at age 83.

Basil married Mary Ann WARE on December 15, 1835.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 27 M i. James McCORD was born in 1841.
+ 28 M ii. Robert McCORD was born in 1845 and died in 1852, at age 7. He never married.
+ 29 F iii. Nancy McCORD was born in 1837 and died in 1839, at age 2.
+ 30 F iv. Martha McCORD was born in 1837 and died in 1841, at age 4.
 
Fourth Generation

26. Robert Eugene NEAL (Richard Southard 12, John Briscoe 5, Basil 1). Robert married Emma Amelia FORTSON. Robert next married Sallie FORTSON, daughter of Benjamin FORTSON and Unknown.

27. James McCORD (Basil McCORD 25, Nancy "Ann" NEAL 9, Basil 1) was born in 1841.

28. Robert McCORD (Basil McCORD 25, Nancy "Ann" NEAL 9, Basil 1) was born in 1845 and died in 1852, at age 7. He never married.

29. Nancy McCORD (Basil McCORD 25, Nancy "Ann" NEAL 9, Basil 1) was born in 1837 and died in 1839, at age 2.

30. Martha McCORD (Basil McCORD 25, Nancy "Ann" NEAL 9, Basil 1) was born in 1837 and died in 1841, at age 4.

1 Obituary, Information from Obituary. Surety: 4

2 Tombstone. Surety: 4 When Llewellin was 12, his father died. Basil was buried in the family burial plot under a stone hand carved by Llewellin. Another, larger stone, reading "Basil Neal, Rev. War" and placed by the Daughters, or the American Revolution, pays tribute to Basil's role in the colonial struggle for freedom.

3. Culpeper Virginia Library, Virginia Marriage Index. Surety: 3