The O'Neal Ham Radio Page

 
 
The first sign of a Ham Operator is the huge antenna farm on his "shack."
Inside his shack you'll find an array of electronic equipment.
You can also spot a Ham Operator by his License Plate.
If you can't spot the License look for the light bar...
.....or the multiple antennas....
...or the gear cluttering up the console.

Since the invention of radio, Ham or Amateur Radio Operators have played an important role in the development of equipment, providing homeland security, providing search and rescue efforts, etc. Most conscientious hams belong the the Amateur Radio Relay League, The Amateur Radio Emergency Service, The American Red Cross, Their local Emergency Management Unit and NOAA's Skywarn Units.

Hams are vastly underrated for their community services. Hams are on the scene every time Red Cross and EMA units are called out. For the most part they provide communications between the different service agencies involved in any disaster scenario. If you are a ham or know a ham that should be listed on this page, please let me know.

This page is dedicated to our O'Neal Ham Operators past and present.

Currently living Hams
NAME
LICENSE CLASS
SINCE
CALLSIGN
John W. O'Neal, II
Advanced
1990
N8NCK
Joe R. Tucker
Extra
1962
KN5W
Ramona Tucker
General
1962
KA5ISN
David Larry 
(O'Neil) Nix
Advanced
1993
N5TQU

 
Silent Keys*
NAME
LICENSE CLASS
SINCE
CALLSIGN
Eric John O'Neal
Novice
1991-1998
KB8WIW

*In the early days of Ham Radio, before voice communications,
operators used a "Key" or Morse Code Keyer to communicate.
Thus, when a Ham died, he was fondly remembered as a "Silent Key."


1994-Me and my amateur radio station