O'Neals in The Civil War
This page was researched and prepared by our cousin, Kenneth O'Neal on 12/23/2001
They shall not grow old, 
As we that are left grow old, 
Age shall not weary them . .
Nor the years condemn. 
 At the going down of the sun, 
And in the morning, We will remember them!
  -- Lawrence Binyon
I have fought a good fight 
 I have finished my course 
I have kept the faith. 
 
 

-- Timothy 2:4:7

War drew us from our homeland 
In the sunlit springtime of our youth. 
Those who did not come back alive remain 
 in perpetual springtime -- forever young -- 
And a part of them is with us always.
                                                                                        -- Author Unknown

The below were all in the 138th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (PVI) Company D that was mustered into service August 29, and Sept. 2, 1862. This Company saw some furious fighting, and had over half of it's Officers and men either killed or wounded during the war. All of those listed with the exception of Hezekiah, who was a nephew, were cousins of my g-grandfather Emanuel O'Neal.
This information is found in the book "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881", The 138th Co. D is found on page 154 –156. All other information found from page 117 to page 169 of this book.

Emanuel O'Neal
138th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company D
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881"

David Snider
Wounded, 138th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company D
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881"

Hezekiah O'Neal
nephew of Enanuel, died Dec. 4, 1863 of accidental wounds received Nov. 21, 1863
138th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company D
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881"

Bernard Nycum
138th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company D
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881"

John Nycum
died June 28, 1864, at Washington DC from wounds received at Cold Harbor June 1 1864
138th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company D
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881"

John E. O'Neal
was a Corporal
138th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company D
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881"

Jonathan Snider
Was First Sgt. and was wounded May 6, 1863 at Wilderness, VA, and at Cedar Creek October 19, 1864 and died of those wounds October 22, 1864.
138th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company D
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881"


Jonathon Snider

The 138th Pennsylvania was engaged in battles at The Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Cedar Creek, Spotsylvania and others. Of these young Bedford men, Hezekiah O'Neal, John Nycum and Jonathan Snider were killed and did not return to their homes in Bedford.
On October 19, 1864 at Cedar Creek, south of Winchester, Virginia, the 138th Pennsylvania, as part of General Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah, was engaged in battle with General Jubal Early's Confederate Army. By the end of the battle, many thousands of young men had been killed or wounded.
Among those wounded was Jonathan Snider, who was wounded in both legs. He died in General Sheridan's hospital at Winchester on October 22. Jonathan was initially buried in a grave in what is now the National Cemetery at Winchester. But Jonathan's final resting place is the family plot at the Ash-Snider Cemetery in Monroe Township, Bedford County.


Other O’Neal Relatives in Bedford County, Pennsylvania Units

Joseph H. SPARKS,
Pvt; Musician, 133rd Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company K Mustered in Aug. 8, 1862 out May 25, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

John C. SPARKS
Pvt. 133rd Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company K Mustered in Aug. 8, 1862 out May 25, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Silas H. SPARKS
Pvt; 133rd Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company K Mustered in Aug. 8, 1862 out May 25, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Jacob SPARKS
Died at Fairmouth, VA Mar. 16, 1863
Pvt. 133rd Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company K Mustered in Aug. 8, 1862 out May 25, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Bernard NYCUM
Pvt.133rd Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company K Mustered in Aug. 8, 1862 out May 25, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

William SPARKS
101 Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company D
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Uria SPARKS
Sgt. 107th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Mustered in Mar. 12, 1862 Wounded at Gettysburg July 1, 1865 Mustered out July 13, 1865
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

John C. SPARKS
John SPARKS (name might have been duplicated. Both on list)
194th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

John Q.A. NYCUM
1st Sgt; 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry Company D (this unit signed on for only 3 month term) mustered in June 18, 1863 out August 18, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Wilson W. SPARKS
Sgt; 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry Company D (this unit signed on for only 3 month term) mustered in June 18, 1863 out August 18, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Agustus SNYDER
Pvt: 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry Company D (this unit signed on for only 3 month term) mustered in June 18, 1863 out August 18, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Jacob H. SNYDER
Pvt; 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry Company G
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

James R. O’NEAL
208th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company K
1st Sgt., Wounded at Ft. Steadman, VA March 25, 1863 Discharged May 30, 1863
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Wilson SPARKS
208th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry CompanyK,
2nd Lieutenant from Pvt. Sept 10, 1864
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

Able Johnson 2nd Husband of Sarah A. O’Neal
91st Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company A
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",

John Hamilton 1st Husband of Sarah A. O’Neal
110th Regiment of The Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company C
Source: "History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties Pennsylveaia 1881",



 
 

Other O’Neal Relatives who served in the Civil War

JAMES MADISON CUTTS 1838-1903, Husband of Eleanor O'Neale
Born in Washington, D.C. in 1838 he earned the Medal of Honor during the Civil War while serving as Captain, 11th United States Infantry, at The Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Petersburg, Virginia, in 1864. The Medal was actually issued on May 2, 1891. He died on February 24, 1903 and was buried in Section 3 of Arlington National Cemetery. His grandson, James Madison Cutts III (April 5, 1891-June 8, 1971) who served as a Sergeant in the U.S. Army from the District of Columbia is buried in the same section.
CUTTS, JAMES M. Rank and organization: Captain, 11th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Wilderness; Spotsylvania; Petersburg, Virginia, 1864. Entered service at: Illinois. Birth: Washington, D.C. Date of issue: 2 May 1891. Citation: Gallantry in actions.
Source: The Arlington National Cemetery Webpage
A month after joining the 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, Private J. Madison Cutts, Jr. pledged to his dying brother-in-law, Senator Stephen A. Douglas, that he would honorably serve his country and his family in the War Between the States. As a captain, he fought gallantly on General Burnside's staff in the early days of the war but was later court-martialed for conduct unbecoming an officer. President Lincoln gave him a personal reprimand and sent him back to join his unit, the 11th U.S.
Infantry Regiment, and the Army of the Potomac. Madison was determined to regain his honor, and as a result distinguished himself at the Battles of the      Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Petersburg, and became universally recognized as a "Hero of the Republic."
Source: "HERO OF THE REPUBLIC, TRIPLE Medal of Honor Winner, JAMES MADISON CUTTS, JR.", By Bing G. Spitler







JOHN ELLSWORTH O'NEAL 1843-1924
John was in the Civil War, Company D, 138 Regiment, Penn Vol: Enlisted 17 Aug, 1862: Promoted to Corporal 30 Jun, 1864:
Discharged 23 Jun, 1865.
August 17, 1862 he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry and was first sent to Relay House near Baltimore. In June (1863) he went to Harper's Ferry and joined the Army of the Potomac, under General Mead and took part in the following engagements: Snicker's Gap, Grande Station, Cedar Grove, Mine Run, Brisker Station, Cedar Mountain, Rappahannock Station, battle of the Wilderness under Grant, *Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, the Siege of Petersburg and tearing up of the railroad at Reems Station.
Pearl O'Neal said that at St. Petersburg, Va. Near Richmond, Grandpa O'Neal tunneled under the Confederate lines because they couldn't break through the confederate lines. The opening to the tunnel is still there. Union Soldiers blew up lines. Confederate reorganized and it didn't accomplish the purpose. John O'Neal lied about his age to get into the Army.
The Army was then sent to the Shenandoah Valley by the way of Baltimore, from there to Battle of Monocacy Junction and to Washington, District of Columbia. He then participated in Sheridan's Raid in the Shenandoah Valley, the battle of Opagan Creek, Winchester, Fisher Hill, Harrisburg, Cedar Creek and then returned to Petersburg and spent the winter in Fort Ducham. The following year came to Siege of Richmond, Appomattox and the surrender of Lee's Army; after which our subject marched with the command to Columbia and participated in the Grand Review and then encamped at Washington until June 23, 1865. During the war Mr. O'Neal received several slight wounds, but never missed a battle in which his regiment participated.
Source: The above is an excerpt from a submission to the Pioneer Library in Bedford County, Pennsylvania; by Dorothy O'Neal Grim on September 28, 1987:
It is taken from the COMPENDIUM OF BIOGRAPHY, by Olgie, 1896,, Miner County, South Dakota:

JOB O'NEAL, 1833-1907
Mr. O'Neal served three years during the Civil War in the 77th Pennsylvania.
The following old soldiers from Ottowa will act as his pall bearers: P. Kaiser, W. W. Fraser, Wm. Howard, Dr. Sparks, Matt Semple, N. H. Lindzy.
Source: Job's Obituary, from a Franklin County, Kansas Newspaper, sent by Dalene Doman.

JAMES DANIEL O'NEALE, 1844-1864,
Howard Co. MO near Boonville--died in Civil War Battle. Dept. of Veterans Affairs, Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, 101 Memorial Drive, St. Lewis, MO 63125. Source: Missouri State Archives Certificate of War Service.


In every war, this one notwithstanding, there are unknown soldiers. Below is a photo of our Unknown Soldier. My Great Aunt Joanna Boone, has this photo at her home in Pennsylvania. It has been handed down through the generations and today nobody knows who he is. He could be an O'Neal, a Livingston, a Miller, a Boone. Joanna said she thinks she recalls that he was a Miller, but can't say for certain.

The photo is about 16 x 24" and housed in a beautiful old gilded frame in Joanna's attic. she said she plans on donating it to the Historical Society.
It appears to be an old daguerreotype, glued onto a cardboard backing, with a pastel crayon overlay.
If anyone can help us identify this unknown soldier, please come forward.

Executive Mansion
Washington, November 21, 1864

To Mrs. Bixby, Boston, Mass.

Dear Madam,

I have been shown in the files of the War Department
a statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts,
that you are the mother of five sons who have died
gloriously on the field of battle.

I feel how weak and fruitless must be any words
of mine which should attempt to beguileyou from
     the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot
refrain from tendering to you the consolation that
may be found in the thanks of the Republic they
died to save.

I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the
anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only
the cherished memory of the loved and  lost,
and the solemn pride that must be yours,  to have
laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of Freedom.

Yours very sincerely and respectfully,

A. Lincoln